Safe & Successful Return

All seven members of the 2019 expedition have returned safe, successful and well from Bockfjord. Welcomed back into Manchester Airport by ARG Group Leader and Home Agent, Ian Frearson, the team are really pleased with how things went and their various experiences.

Bockford 2019

With research data, imagery and samples collected, another phase of work begins so that the efforts and contributions of members, sponsors, supporters and everyone involved are realised in delivery of the outputs from the expedition.
Firstly a short time to be back with family & friends and for some recovery from the exertions of the trip and the travelling. All too soon several of the team will be back at work and dealing with the surge of unread emails and messages having been out of WiFi range for the period of the trip.

Thankfully the precautions the team took to protect from bear attack were only put to theoretical test when trip wires were either deliberately or accidentally triggered by themselves. There were no sightings of polar bear in Bockfjord and yet there was another expedition not so far away that had tents and gear destroyed although gratefully, nobody was hurt in the incident.

After the initial break work will begin in earnest to sort and classify samples, undertake analyses, edit and put together film and photographs so that the all important element of reports may begin.

Look out for more information coming to this site and instructions on how to access these reports soon.

More support received

The generosity of individual supporters for the ARG is amazing. Using online fundraising through our social media networks we have raised much needed funds towards the cost of the expedition. Thank you to all those who have been kind enough to donate. One generous supporter commented “I’m not able to go and do the sort of things you will be doing for the good of the planet and my donation is my way of being involved with you and doing my bit vicariously”.

We have also been generously loaned key pieces of kit that will help us to achieve our goals and do it safely. Two separate sources have supplied us; one with a hand held EPIRB and the other a bank of VHF marine radios. We’re also grateful that we will have a satellite telephone with us to be able to communicate with the media and our home agent, Ian Frearson.

With these essential tools we will be able to communicate effectively with each other and should the situation arise, where we need outside assistance to come to our help, then we have the emergency communication that links through the satellites back to the UK Maritime and Coastguard Agency to send support.

Smiles all round

Henry Staley on his first Arctic expedition:

“I feel very lucky to be invited on this expedition to Svalbard. This amazing opportunity will be a challenging but rewarding experience and hopefully a gateway to further expeditions around the world. I am particularly excited to have the chance to become involved in research regarding plastic pollution. Hopefully this will improve our understanding of the issue and help to affect a change in our daily use of plastic”.

As medical officer, Henry will be providing medical support to the team. “Expedition medicine is of huge interest to me and I am thrilled to have been given this position.  I will also be conducting research into the changes in oral hygiene habits on an expedition, and this will be a relevant piece of research for my studies as a dental student”. 


Newest members thoughts

“Being invited on this expedition is a chance that maybe only occurs once in a lifetime and it is a dream come true for me.  Growing up seeing all the photos and maps from my Dad’s various expeditions with the Arctic Research Group during 30 years, I’ve always wanted to go and explore this rare place.

William Shaw

This expedition will not only give me experience with research and exploration, while also looking outstanding on any application for jobs or post-grads.  But it is also a fleeting chance to see the high arctic in its undisturbed state before factors like climate change, pollution and increased shipping traffic begin to damage this rare place even more”.

William Shaw