Wilderness First Aid Training

Preparations for the remoteness of the next expedition location includes specialist training in first aid on a course that has been arranged for the weekend of 1st & 2nd June in Derbyshire.

The course is being provided exclusively tailored to ensure that the team members all have the capability of handling injury situations with calmness and knowledge, that will maximise the opportunity for survival until more sophisticated medical treatment can be accessed.

Training will include dealing with scenarios such as bear attack and firearm injuries, as well as cold water immersion and frostbite.  There are still severe implications for any ‘normal’ injuries such as fractures and deep cuts when at significant distance and time away from professional medical assistance and resources.

Training weekend deferred

Responding to a set of circumstances topped off by a forecast of rain showers and strong winds – that would preclude flying the drone – as well as the unexpected unavailability of several members, the decision was taken to defer the training weekend to a later date. The opportunity wasn’t wasted as members focussed on other tasks of planning and fundraising.

Boots remain hanging until another day

Training weekend set for early March

Members of the 2019 expedition will be out in the Peak District National Park putting themselves and their equipment through its paces during a training session set for early March. Whilst fundraising is key to achieving the maximum return out of the expedition research, the team working together on fitness and Arctic capabilities, as well as developing familiarity with the technical equipment that they will be using, is also essential. The session will include in particular, practice flying of the drone to explore the techniques required to deliver the maximum from the extended research scope the drone is expected to help realise.

Drone training for expedition members

Ollie Hartas of Hartas Productions – sports videography – very generously flew to the UK from his home in Sweden recently to spend a day training the expedition members in flight and operation of the Mavic Pro drone that will be used on this years’ expedition. The drone will provide additional input to each of the expedition projects as well as aerial video of the expedition activities and the stunning scenery of the high arctic landscape. “Flying the drone is so intuitive and it is so precisely controllable, with high definition video & still imagery, that it clearly will allow us to add significantly to our research”. Commented expedition leader Steve Staley.

Mavic Pro drone